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UDO É DIVINO, MARAVILHOSO 

Brazil, 1967.

A few singers, writers, artists, and thinkers used music and art to oppose the political, economical and also aesthetic and moral authoritarianism and conservatism prevalent in the country.

This short-lived movement was to be called Tropicália.

With its irreverence, Tropicália transformed the reigning criteria of taste, not only in music and politics, but also in morals, behaviour, and looks. The hippie counterculture was welcomed, with the adoption of long curly hair and colourful clothes.

The movement, libertarian par excellence, lasted for little more than a year and was firmly repressed by the military government.

“Divino, Maravilhoso” was an experimental weekly TV program, featuring Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil and other tropicalists, broadcasted every Monday, live with a studio audience, from October to December 1968. “Divino, Maravilhoso” was also the title of the song performed by Gal Costa at the fourth Festival of Brazilian Music in 1968. It came fourth but Gal gave an aggressive and piercing, unforgettable performance.

The movement changed the country’s culture and society and resonates still today.

By talking about Tropicália, we want to remind younger generations that it is OK to be different, to be irreverent, to dare, to fight for one’s dreams. Small or big.